Originally Published By: Greg Okhifun Having a job in many ways improves an individual’s health and overall attitude toward life. However, many people face significant stress in the workplace that it outweighs any possible benefits and even poses a threat to their health. The United States’ National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health defines job stress as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Job stress can, in turn, lead to poor health and even injury. Many workers report experiencing work-related stress at their jobs and this compromises their performance and health. A recent survey by Northwestern National Life revealed that about 40% of workers reported that their jobs were extremely stressful. In another survey by Yale University, 29% of workers reported feeling extreme stress because of their jobs.
  Can and should you ban cell phones at work?   An employer can prohibit its employees from accessing devices while working, unless that denial infringes on their right to engage in protected concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act.
Since almost the beginning of management research, we’ve known that social dynamics affect workplace performance. Indeed, one of the pivotal questions of Gallup’s famous employee engagement survey asks whether respondents “have a best friend at work.” But while friendship at work always being a good thing is a strong assumption, recent research suggests that having a close friend in the workplace might be more nuanced than we assume. There are definitely benefits, but there are also costs.
How do you stay competitive when employee perks are higher than ever been before? Netflix, Facebook, and Google pay top dollar and offer some of the best benefit packages to ever exist. On the other side, turnover rates are also higher than ever before. Today, the average person has four different jobs before the age of thirty two. Twenty years ago, the averaged person had only two jobs before they were thirty two (CNN Money). The question is, do better perks equal happier employees? See what we found keeps employees happy and tenured at a company.
Organizations used to be able to cook up a successful sales team with a few basic ingredients: a quality product, a compelling compensation plan, a simple training program and effective sales tracking. Not so anymore. Millennials have changed the recipe.
They may be at work, but that doesn’t mean employees are actually working. According to a new survey from CareerBuilder, more than 1 in 5 employers estimate their employees are only productive for five hours of the day
It just may be the crime of the century. Our minds, thoughts and chief productivity tool--attention--are being stolen by a thief operating with absolute impunity: incessant, unbounded interruptions. An ever-growing volume of intruders--e-mail, texts, apps, phone calls, social media alerts--combined with assaults from increasingly time-panicked humans, are leaving few places safe.
What makes a good manager? The answer may vary according to the size of the business, the industry it operates in and lots of other factors. Yet, we can find similarities between great managers: they are all leaders with a clear vision of the future and a heartfelt desire to innovate. A good leader will also influence people and know how to motivate them.
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