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Top 10 Signs You’re happy at Work.


In the usual frustrations that come from working with other human beings, sometimes it’s easy to miss these signs that we really do love what do every day.
These are all quite personal reasons, but organization leadership can do a great deal to foster a work environment and culture of recognition in which it’s easier for employees to love their jobs.

  1. You have friends at work. We simply want to work with and for people we like and respect.
  2. You enjoy helping your colleagues. You’re as invested in their success as in your own.
  3. You’re shocked that it’s already 4:00 in the afternoon. The days fly by because you’re engaged in and enjoy what you’re doing.
  4. You hate it when you’re sick because people are counting on you! You don’t want to let anyone down, though you know others are more than happy to fill in for you while you recover.
  5. Weekends are just a way to recharge for Monday. You never have a “case of the Mondays” because the work you do matters to you.
  6. You look for ways to share credit with others. You don’t feel the need to hoard credit to prove your worth. You want everyone to share in the success.
  7. “Going the extra mile” is just the way you work. You’ve never “worked-to-rule” because it’s just natural to do more and exceed everyone’s expectations.
  8. Typical “annoyances” at work just don’t bother you all that much. Let’s face it. Work and the work environment are never perfect, but the usual petty problems tend to roll of your back because you’re focused on the bigger issues.
  9. You find yourself looking for solutions instead of griping about problems with your colleagues. Instead of complaining around the water cooler (or coffee machine), you and your friends chat about ways to make things better and run more smoothly.
  10. You know what you do matters and makes a difference to the bigger picture. You’re able to focus on the big picture because you fully understand how what you do every day helps turn that picture into a masterpiece.


What are some other signs that you love what you do?

 

Originally published by:
You can find more from Derek Irvine on his Recognize This! blog.
Derek Irvine is Vice President, Client Strategy & Consulting Service at Globoforce, a global provider of strategic employee recognition and reward programs. In his role as a thought leader for employee recognition at Globoforce, Derek helps clients set a higher ambition for global, strategic employee recognition, leading consultative workshops and strategy setting meetings with such organizations as Avnet, Celestica, Dow Chemical, Intuit, KPMG, Logica, P&G, Symantec, and Thompson Reuters. Contact him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Friday, 02 August 2013

20 Things 20-Year-Olds Don't Get

Super article this week by Jason Nazar

I started Docstoc in my 20’s, made the cover of one of those cliché “20 Under 20” lists, and today I employ an amazing group of 20-somethings.

Published in Human Resources

The average American worker today stays at his or her job a mere 4.4 years, according to a recent Forbes article, while Gen Y’ers (those born between 1977 and 1997) are leaving in a fraction of that time—91 percent expect to stay in a job fewer than three years.

Published in Recruiting

What makes a good manager?

The answer may vary according to the size of the business, the industry it operates in and lots of other factors. Yet, we can find similarities between great managers: they are all leaders with a clear vision of the future and a heartfelt desire to innovate. A good leader will also influence people and know how to motivate them.

Published in Workforce Management

If everything seems under control, you’re not going fast enough.”Mario Andretti, American race car driver.

The world is changing very fast. Big will not beat small anymore. It will be the fast beating the slow.” — Rupert Murdoch, Australian-American media mogul.

“I’ve always found that the speed of the boss is the speed of the team.” — Lee Iacocca, former CEO and Chairman of Chrysler Corporation.

Though we like to think of ourselves as living in the Space Age or the Information Era, future historians may well label this the “Hurry Up Epoch.”

For decades now, we’ve scrambled to keep pace with technological change, ramping up our productivity to startling levels, which helps us further advance our technology, leading to greater productivity … and so on, in a rising spiral.

Nowadays you have to put the pedal to the metal, or the go-getters will leave you eating their dust, taking big bites off the edges of your market. You can’t compete effectively without an agile internal culture capable of reducing time-to-market and cycle speed for all essential processes.

This begs the question: how do you build and maintain such a culture of speed? Let’s look at some principles.

Published in Workforce Management

They may be at work, but that doesn’t mean employees are actually working. According to a new survey from CareerBuilder, more than 1 in 5 employers estimate their employees are only productive for five hours of the day

Published in Workforce Management