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In one sense, your company’s hire strategy is complex and meticulous. You draft a comprehensive job description, thoroughly analyze resumes, and conduct in-depth interviews to ensure you hire the right person for the position. On the other hand, some aspects of the hiring process are so simple that a child could provide some insight. Originally published by: EmployeeScreenIQ Blog by Lauren Conners Surprisingly, you may have learned more in kindergarten than you knew that can be applicable to the employment background screening process. Take a look at how you can apply these eight lessons from kindergarten to your screening program. 1. Share with others.In general, employment background checks reveal information about a person’s past employment history and education. They can confirm details presented on a resume, such as dates of employment for a particular employer or when they graduated from college. Any major discrepancies could raise a red flag in…
Are you using social media to screen candidates for your latest job vacancy, or even before inviting them in for an interview?
A recent and very extensive survey by Universum, the employer branding firm, (reported in Forbes) surveyed 1,200 of the world’s leading employers to find out exactly what personal qualities today’s big businesses are looking for in candidates. They were asking employers what they were looking for and equally what they were failing to find; so, this survey is a great up-to-the -minute snapshot of what qualities candidates must exhibit to raise the eyebrows of employers and make it through the sift and interview process. So, what were these elusive qualities?
This legislation comes as a shot to business groups, many of whom regard credit checks as a safeguard against hiring people who may have trouble with money for positions of trust that involving the handling of money. According to a 2012 SHRM survey, among organizations that initiate credit background checks, 87 percent do so for positions with financial responsibilities.
Wednesday, 28 November 2012

6 Resume Red Flags for the Modern Age

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As we all know times are changing and the recruitment and candidate market place is changing with it. Candidates no longer submit hand-written, hard copy resumes; they don’t always interview face-to-face. No-one expects a job for life these days; candidates have a wealth of job search information resources available to them on the Internet and they can apply for jobs at the click of a button. These changes to the recruiting and job seeking landscape are beginning to filter through to the resume short-listing process, which must adapt to suit the modern marketplace. For example, where once a candidate who changed jobs twice in a decade might have seemed unstable, in the modern age this might be the norm and could even constitute a long tenure. So, I thought it would be a good time to take stock five of the key resume red flags and update them to ensure…
Resumes are the currency of recruiting. Job sites, recruiters, and hiring managers all require them and use them to screen both prospects and candidates in or out. Because at least early on, resumes are the sole determinant as to whether a candidate moves forward or not in the hiring process, it’s important to understand their strengths and weaknesses. essential part of the candidate assessment process. The premise of this article is that if you are going to continue to rely so heavily on resumes, everyone involved needs to be aware of each and every one of the many weaknesses and problems associated with using them.
Let’s face it. The economy is still a mess and people aren’t finding jobs fast enough. Given this fact, there are a lot of people looking to place the blame for these developments. And has been the case for the last several years, many are focusing on employment screening and background checks. I won’t say that all who oppose background check are flat out wrong in every instance, but all too frequently they rely on myths, misconceptions and urban legends to support their arguments. Here is my list of the most commonly held misconceptions about employment background checks:
According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 66 percent of substance abusers aged 18 and over are employed. With this knowledge at hand, one would assume that a vast majority of employers use employee drug screening.